Tour ‘Iolani Palace – Hawaii’s Royal Residence in Honolulu’s Historic District

King David Kalakaua was the last king of the Hawaiian Kingdom. His sister, Queen Liliuokalani was the last monarch of the Hawaiian Kingdom, overthrown by American sugar planters and American military interests. King Kalakaua built the palace as a symbol to the people of Hawai’i and a message to all the nations of the world that Hawai’i is an educated, civilized, and advanced society ready to take the place as one of the biright lights of advanced human civilizations.

King Kalakaua had met Thomas Edison and arranged to have electric lighting installed into ‘Iolani Palace as early as 1887. After meeting Alexander Graham Bell, he had a telephone installed in the palace. Indoor plumbing (with flush toilets) was original in the palace when it was completed in 1882. ‘Iolani Palace had a telephone, indoor plumbing, and electric lighting before the White House had any of the three.

To tour the interior of the palace you must first visit Hale Koa aka the ‘Iolani Barracks – this is on the palace grounds and should not be confused with the Hale Koa Hotel (House of Warriors) in Waikiki which is for U.S. servicemen and women. ‘Iolani Barracks was moved from the Diamond Head side of the palace grounds to where it currently sits. It was built in 1870 for the household royal guards of King Kamehameha V. Today it is where the gift shop, the ticket office, and a small video theatre are located. It was designed by Theodor Hacek, a German architect who also designed Queen’s Hospital.

On the ocean side from ‘Iolani Barracks is the Coronation Pavilion built in 1883 for the coronation of King Kalalkaua and his wife Queen Kapi’olani. On the grounds are large banyan trees originally planted as saplings by Queen Kapi’olani and a large kukui nut tree (candle nut) planted by U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt.

‘Iolani means royal hawk in Hawaiian language. The palace itself is built a a unique architectural style called American Florentine. The tour is a poignant reminder of all the Hawaiian people lost. Their kingdom, their monarchs, their self rule, and for many years – their heritage. There are docent tours in the morning but later in the day you can take the self guided audio tours provided. Tour and admission is $27 for adults and $6 for children (5-12). Babies and toddlers under five years old get free admission and there are discounts for kama’aina and military. You can also download the Iolani Palace app here. This is a surprisingly kid friendly tour and our seven-year-old had fun seeing where the real King and Queen of Hawaii lived. She was also livid when she found out that the conspirators charged Queen Liliuokalani with treason and imprisoned her in her bedroom after the kingdom was overthrown. Plan on spending 2-3 hours and if you bring a picnic, you can eat your lunch on the palace lawns after (or before) your tour.

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Saturday Slideshow – Lucky Live Hawai’i – Lucky Live Oahu – Lucky Live Honolulu

In Hawai’i we have a local language called Hawaiian Creole or Pidgin for short. You’ve heard it when you’ve watched Hawaii 5-0, you’ll hear it on the new Magnum P.I. You’ve heard it on Dog the Bounty Hunter and if you’ve been here – you’ve heard the bus drivers, valets, maids, surfers, beach boys, and other local folks use it. You probably didn’t understand it – and that’s okay. It has a sing-song quality that varies from island to island and consists of words from a dozen languages plus a bunch of made up words that are usually onamatopia. Example: Brah, like go kaukau? Or Howzit? Or Hoh, Lucky live Hawai’i. Yea, Lucky live Hawaii, Lucky live Oahu, Lucky live Honolulu. That’s what I’m feeling – this week’s slideshow might show a bit of why.

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Tropical Farms – A Family Run Hawaiian Macadamia Nut Farm Outlet on Oahu

I love taking people to Tropical Farms, also known as the Macadamia Nut Place on the Windward Side of Oahu. It’s a different world compared to the rest of the tourist stops. Sure, there are still the Robert’s of Hawaii busses filled with Japanese, Chinese, or Middle American tourists (fun fact which may or may not be true – the average American bus tourist takes up at least twice the space of the average Chinese or Japanese tourist).

As you’re driving up the lush windward side, you see a couple of flags and a steep driveway – and you turn into it. Once you park you are greeted by an aloha shirted local with a big smile and a genuines sense of aloha. “Aloha, Welcome to Tropical Farms” – inside there is free coffee and plenty of free nut samples – garlic, cinnamon, caramel, honey, salted, plain – try them all. Also local jewelry, artisanal products, and products made from the miracle fruit – Noni. If it does even a quarter of what people claim – it’s truly a miracle.

In the back there are bins of fresh macadamia nuts you can crack open on lava rocks and of course, no shortage of chickens. One of the most authentic luau’s on the island takes place back there and there are tropical farm tours available with Samoan story tellers. On the property you will find guava, coffee, plenty of tropical flowers, and of course, macadamia. Macadamia, by the way, come originally from Australia – but they grow a little different here. You’ll see plenty of Aussies lining up with full baskets – because Tropical Farms charges half what the mac-nuts go for at home.

The best part about Tropical Farms though, is that it is a family place. You’ll find pictures of ‘Mom and Dad’ and ‘Dad’s’ surfboard (probably great-granddad’s now, actually) and much more. The crew working there are locals or family members and the aloha is genuine.

Honolulu, Hawaii Architecture: Saturday Slideshow

It’s no secret that I love Honolulu. It’s an incredibly walkable, bikeable, and public-transportation-able city. The weather is perfect. It has fantastic architecture and wonderful distinct neighborhoods – not to mention beaches, rain forest hikes, and more. But let’s get back to that architecture – I will get into the nitty gritty of the art deco, moorish, modern, and classic styles you find here in the future – but for now – I’d just like to share a gallery of pictures of buildings I’ve snapped in Honolulu. These are just pictures I’ve taken as I go about my daily life…and I think they illustrate a bit of why I love this city as much as I do.

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For now just enjoy the wonderful architecture of Honolulu and ahui ho!

Visiting the Kamaka Ukulele Factory – A Family Business with 101 years of Experience in Hawaii Ukuleles

The Kamaka Ukulele is the gold standard in fine ukulele quality and there is a reason for that. The Kamaka family has been making the best ukes in the world since 1916 when Honolulu resident Sam Kamaka Sr began making the instruments in his Kaimuki basement. Since then the Hawaiian ukulele has made it’s way around the world in the hands of celebrities, musicians, comics, vaudeville stars, visitors, and Hawaii residents. Four generations of the Kamaka family have kept the Kamaka Ukulele factory running with the guiding principle of quality first.

Sam Sr and his two sons Fred Sr and Sam Jr are all three inductees into the Ukulele Hall of Fame. The elder Sam was the inventor of the ‘pineapple’ ukulele – it was 1918 and he just liked the idea of making the body a little more round – turns out it made the sound a little more rich. Sam Kamaka Sr. said to his sons, “If you make instruments and use the family name…don’t make junk,” and lucky for all of us, they listened. Fred Kamaka Sr and his brother Sam Kamaka, Jr –  still run the Kamaka Ukulele Factory where  twenty-five employees – mostly family members – continue to make the world’s best ukes.. The factory produces a maximum of 17 ukes per day…

As a long time ukulele fan, it was awesome to get to meet Fred Sr. (And Fred Jr.) and get to talk story with them and learn about the history of my favorite istrument…the true Hawaiian Ukulele.  I also met Sam Jr’s son Chris Kamaka. He is the quality control officer and rejects one out of every five ukes produced in the factory because of inferior grain, sound defects, or other imperfections that would be invisible to the rest of us.

If you would like to visit the Kamaka Ukulele factory and meet some of the family, see how these beautiful instruments are made, and maybe even learn how to play a simple tune – it’s still possible. The factory, located in downtown Honlulu near Kaka’ako is open several days a week. 

Saturday Slideshow: I Love Honolulu – It’s Perfect – Even if it’s not Perfect

I love living in Honolulu. I work all the time and still don’t make enough money to pay all my expenses. I rarely have time to go to the beach. I have a smaller and much more expensive living space than I’ve had in a decade. I am stuck in my car looking for parking all the time. And still, I love living in Honolulu. There is no better place in the world as far as I’m concerned. Yes, it could be better, no it’s not perfect, yes, I run the risk of running out of money. It’s hard to explain…if these social and economic conditions, the crowding, the traffic, the expense, the need to work so much…if these conditions were somewhere else, I would be miserable, I would probably be suicidal – but here, I put a record of some goofy tiki-beach songs on or I step outside and see a rainbow or an old auntie crossing the road so slowly in her mumu that I end up being late for work or some gnarly looking truck driver just stops and tells me to go in violation to all traffic rules and common sense – or a homeless guy sitting in the median is playing his ukulele as I drive by or there is an art exhibit in city hall where the employees and their kids are the ones who have their art on display. I’m not kidding. I love living in Honolulu. It’s not easy – in fact, there’s nothing easy about it. Free time is hard to come by, it’s loud at night, the homeless make me cry, the zoo has gone downhill, the lines are long, the prices are insane, the beaches are crowded – and yet…there is no place like it in the world. I am so happy this city is my home.

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Flashback Friday: 2008 PhotoEssay: Urban Hiking in Hawaii – Chinatown Honolulu

This was a very fun day which I am reposting  from a decade ago back on July 3, 2008. The photos were taken with my old Motorola Razor.

Total time: About 3.5 hours
Total $: About $25 including lunch, groceries, and snacks.
Total value: Priceless…check out the pictures if you don’t believe me.

It was just myself and my friend Antje and everyone else really missed out. We met up at the “Bad Ass Coffee Company” at the Aloha Tower Marketplace. Actually, Antje thought I meant the bad “ass coffee” company so she first went to Starbucks…an easy mistake. Anyway we took the elevator to the top of the Aloha Tower after a completely worthless search of our bags by the security guard. He has probably been sitting at that desk since the tower was built in 1926, but if we had been carrying anything bad, he certainly would have missed it in his minimal search. The signs describing the scenic wonders at the top of the tower were more than a little out of date. Nice views though.

From there we walked up Nuuanu stream where we had to hop a couple of fences and do some scrambling to get into the stream bed. Lot’s of old Chinese guys playing cards and homeless people sleeping along the way. We roughed it down the stream doing a lot of rock hopping and seeing frogs, fish, and birds along the way. We emerged at the Kuan Yin Temple and paid a short visit. After that another visit to what I thought I remembered being a taoist temple but that is now a shinto temple (maybe it always was).

Next was a visit to the Chinese Cultural Plaza where there were old men playing Chinese fiddles, mohawked kids in squeaky shoes, and surprisingly nimble old ladies teaching gum chomping little girls how to do traditional Chinese dance. A nice place to eat some dried mango and drink young coconut juice.

We walked into Chinatown proper and browsed some shops, looking at old buildings, and cruising the open markets where there was a bewildering variety of fish and vegetables…not to mention more than a few cockroaches. Don’t worry though, i still bought lots of dirt cheap groceries.

Next we browsed through more shops and ate the award winning food at Little Village. MMMMM!

Finally, a walk back to the tower and farewells until the next time.

The Hitachi Tree in Honolulu’s Moanalua Gardens

On the west side of Honolulu, just near the big pink building (Tripler Army Hospital) before you reach Aloha Stadium – is one of the most famous trees that you’ve seen but never heard of (unless you are Japanese). The tree is located in Moanalua Botanical Gardens, a privately held garden which is open to the public with a small admission fee.

The Hitachi Tree – the symbol of the Hitachi Company – a large monkeypod tree with a distinct umbrella shape that is so important to Hitachi that they have paid a license fee to use it since the early 1970’s.Currently the annual fee is about a half million US dollars. The tree is a huge draw to Japanese tourists, though most Americans or other nationalities have never heard of it.

The Hitachi Tree first originated through a TV commercial that aired in Japan in 1973. It symbolized the “comprehensive drive” and the “wide business range” of the Hitachi Group. It continues today as an image of the Hitachi Group’s working for communities through leveraging of its collective capacities and technologies, and the dedication of the individuals that the Group comprises. The tree is widely recognized, especially in Japan, and has become an important symbol of the Hitachi Group’s reliability, and earth-friendliness. It also enhances Hitachi’s brand value as a visual representation of its corporate slogan: “Inspire the Next.”  Over the past 35 years, the Hitachi Tree has become a valuable Hitachi Group asset as a familiar and respected image in Hitachi’s expanding messages globally.

It is a magnificent tree – but the gardens around it are also worth visiting. The Moanalua Gardens contain the Hitachi Tree and the summer cottage of King Kamehameha V of Hawai’i  which was moved from it’s original location up Nu’uanu Ave and Old Pali Road.. There are beautiful refelction ponds, a stream running through the gardens, a lovely visitor center, and large grassy areas that are perfect for picnics, days playing frisbee, or just lying under a huge trees and reading a book.

One word of advice though,  don’t try to relax under the Hitachi tree – about once an hour a bus full of Japanese tourists will pull in and crowd the area to get a picture with the most famous tree in Japan.

To get there, take the H-1 Freeway West from Honolulu, when the freeway splits into the H-1 or the H-201, stay to the left on the H-201 and take the Moanalua/Pu’uloa Road exit. The entrance to the garden will be on the right side before you get off the ramp. It’s tricky, but you can do it. Watch for the sign that says Moanalua Gardens about midway down the ramp and turn right directly after it.

Honolulu Biki Bikes – A fun and reasonable bikeshare program for Hawai’i

The Biki-Bike (https://gobiki.org) program in Honolulu is a winer. Getting around by bicycle is the best way to get around Honolulu and the Biki-Bike program opened that up to everyone. There were bike rental companies, but the beautiful thing about Biki-Bike is the sheer volume and accessibility. You can pick up a Biki-Bike in 100 station locations around Honolulu. There are 1000 biki-bikes spread through the system at any given time.The bikes sit in the racks waiting for you to enter the code to take them. The bikes themselves are great with fat pothole resistant tires, built-in lights, and easy adjusting seats. These are multi-gear bikes that are kept in constant good maintenance – thank god it’s not the City and County of Honolulu or State of Hawai’i who are doing the maintenance – in about a week they would all be wrecks sitting in piles around the homeless camps – but that’s another story. Biki-Bikes are privately owned and totally kept up.

 

Fares are cheap at $3.50 per 30 minute ride or $15 a month for unlimited 30 minute rides. The idea of Biki is that you grab a bike to get where you are going, put it in a rack, and then when you need another ride, grab it from the rack. The 100 stations are spread out from Chinatown then east to Diamond Head. I live west of Chinatown by a good bit so communing with Biki isn’t an option for me, but if it were, I would be doing it. As it is, parking in town (Honolulu) is a nightmare and sometimes it is far easier to park away from popular locations and then to Biki there. Visitors use the Bikis for exploring Waikiki and our Downtown Historic Districts. There is almost never good parking in Chinatown, near Iolani Palace andthe Kamehameha Statue, or at the Mission Houses Museum, the Honolulu Art Museum, or amongst the highrises of downtown Honolulu for things like Hawaii State Art Museum (HISAM). Biki Bikes make those areas more accessible

Biki is a private public partnership. Bikeshare Hawai’i is a nonprofit group organized to administer Biki Bikes and the day to day operations and equipment are provided by two companies PBSC Urban Solutions and Secure Bike Share. This partnership works.

 

Top 5 Reasons Hawai’i is Still the Best Vacation Destination

A friend from Oregon told me “We keep thinking about taking a trip to Hawai’i but Cancun always wins because it just seems to be a better value for our money.”

I respect the fact that people have to get the most value for their money, but the truth is – there is nowhere that compares to Hawai’i for the vacation of a lifetime. Here are the top five reasons why Hawai’i is still the best vacation destination for anyone.

1) Hawai’i is safe. Violent crimes are extremely rare here. We do not have kindnappings, gang violence, or drug cartels to deal with here. Yes, your rental car may get broken into when you leave your purse in it and yes the cost of your hotel (and everything else) borders on the ridiculous – but unless you are acting like a drunken idiot – your chances of a violent encounter are close to zero.

2) Hawai’i is exotic. In Honolulu there are fifteen languages that are spoken on a daily basis by a large number of residents. (English, Mandarin, Japanese, Tongan, Fijian, Micronesian, Spanish, Portuguese, Samoan, Cantonese, Hawaiian, Pidgin, Korean, Visayan and Illongo) In addition there are many other smaller ethnic groups here which have vibrant communities. Hawai’i residents practice Christianity, Shinto, Taoism, Buddhism, and modern Native Hawaiian traditions. You can have Japenese food for breakfast, Korean for lunch, and Moroccan for dinner.

3) Hawai’i has volcanoes, tropical rain forest, great ocean beaches, and a healthy tourist infrastructure. It’s incredibly rare to hear horror stories from tourists who come to Hawai’i. In fact, I only have met one woman who didn’t enjoy Hawai’i and she said it was because she missed her swimming pool at home…so, not exactly a normal tourist.

4) Hawai’i is a part of the United States but not a part of North America. This means that for Americans, there are no visas, no changing money, no need to bring a language guide book, no extra vaccinations, and lots of the same protections they get at home. For international travelers – Hawai’i is a chance to experience the most unique culture in the American Empire.

5) Hawai’i has a rich history of war, conquest, betrayal, and colonization and a vibrant natural history that includes more endemic plant and bird species than anywhere else on the planet. Hawai’i is the most remote place on the planet and the species that made it here became different from those in every other place. It’s my belief that this is also true of the human culture here, though Americanization is destroying that uniqueness at an unbelievable rate.